Phonics and Reading Schemes

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The government strongly recommend the use of synthetic phonics when teaching early literacy skills to children. Synthetic phonics is simply the ability to convert a letter or letter group into sounds that are then blended together into a word.

Here at Outwood Primary Academy Littleworth Grange, we are using the Read Write Inc (RWI) programme to get children off to a flying start with their literacy. RWI is a method of learning based upon letter sounds and phonics, and we use it to aid children in their reading and writing.

Reading opens the door to learning. A child who reads a lot will become a good reader. A good reader will be able to read more challenging material. A child who can read more challenging material is a child who will learn. The more a child learns, the more he or she will want to find out.

Using RWI, the children learn to read effortlessly so they can put all their energy into comprehending what they read. It also allows them to spell effortlessly so they can put all their energy into composing what they write.
The children are assessed regularly and grouped according to their ability. They will work with a RWI trained teacher or teaching assistant. In addition to the RWI, children will also be working on writing skills in their classes with their own teacher.

The Read Write Inc Leader at Outwood Primary Academy Littleworth Grange is Mrs Hadfield. If you have any questions or need any guidance on the programme, please pop into the school office or give them a call and they will arrange an appointment for you.

Reading

When using RWI to read the children will:
• Learn 44 sounds and the corresponding letter/letter groups using simple prompts.
• Learn to read words using sound blending (Fred talk).
• Read lively stories featuring words they have learnt to sound out.
• Show that they comprehend the stories by answering 'Find It' and 'Prove It'.

Writing

When using RWI to write the children will:
• Learn to write the letter/letter groups which represent the 44 sounds.
• Learn to write words by saying the sounds and graphemes (Fred fingers).
• Learn to write simple then more complex sentences.
• Compose stories based on story strips.
• Compose a range of texts using discussion prompts.

Talking

When using RWI the children will also work in pairs:
• To answer questions.
• To practise every activity.
• To take turns talking and listening to each other.
• To give positive praise to each other.

Blending

Help your child learn to read words by sounding-blending (Fred talk) eg. c-a-t = cat, sh-o-p = shop. Children learn to read words by blending the letter-sounds that are in the Speed Sounds set (the links are further down the page).

Reading Books Sent Home

When children start in Reception they will begin to bring home Set 1 sounds. Once the children are able to recognise these sounds they will begin to bring home an Oxford Reading Tree conversation book.
Once children can blend fluently, they will begin to bring home a Read Write Inc book and an Oxford Reading Tree Book.

Once children can blend fluently, they will begin to bring home a Read Write Inc book and an Oxford Reading Tree Book.

Year One
Children on Green level to Orange level will bring home a RWI book, an Oxford Reading Tree and a Book Banded Book.
They also have access to Bug Club where they have been assigned books. Please use this valuable resource.
Read Write Inc Books: Please encourage your child to read though the speed sounds page first, then the green and red words page and then check your child understands the meaning of words on the vocabulary check page, before they start reading the book. Your child will have read this book at least three times before they bring it home. They should be able to read this book with fluency and expression by the time they bring it home and they should have a good comprehension of what the book is about. At the back of the book are find it/prove it questions for you to do with your child.

Oxford Reading Tree: These books are to extend your child's reading. Your child should be able to read most of this book however they might need a little support, especially with the first read.

The following section shows the order of the books.

Within each colour, you can see which set of sounds your child should be reading and the corresponding green and red words.

Sounds and Books

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Ditties

Purple

Pink

Orange

Yellow

Blue

Grey

Bug Club

Bug Club is a finely-levelled reading scheme, which ensures that all children can find books at exactly the right level for them. What’s more, there are online versions for every printed title and a personalised website for each child.

Your child can enjoy reading Bug Club books online. Each child has a unique homepage, and can log into it by following these steps:

1. Go to www.bugclub.co.uk
2. Enter the login details.
3. Your child’s homepage will appear.

We allocate books to your child according to their reading levels. These books will appear on their personal homepages.

Throughout the books there are quiz questions for your child to complete. To answer a question, just click on the bug icon. Your child does not need to finish all the quiz questions in one sitting and can come back to a book later.
When your child has finished all the quiz questions in a book, he or she will earn ‘Bug Points’. By reading more books, your child will earn enough points for a reward. The answers to the quiz questions will be sent back to our teacher site so that we can see how your child is progressing. We will also be able to assign more books for your child to read if the virtual book bag is running low.

When your child has finished a book, it will move to ‘Books I have read’ (for KS1) or ‘Look again’ (for KS2). Children can read these books again if they want to, or they can choose new books from ‘My Books’.

Getting involved

The reader
Until they are fluent readers, younger children will benefit from reading aloud to you as often as possible. By the time they are in Years 5 or 6, many children prefer to read silently to themselves. Create quiet opportunities for them to do so, but then talk to them about the book they are reading.

Sharing reading

When sharing a book with your child, try to take opportunities to talk about the book – before, during and after reading.

Before reading: look at the book cover and talk about your child’s expectations. Is the book likely to be fiction or non-fiction? Have you read other books together about these characters or by this author? What does your child think the book is going to be about?

While reading: support your child when unknown words need tackling: you can sound them out, split them into syllables, or identify suffixes and prefixes. Remind your child to listen to the words while reading them, to make sure that they make sense. Have a ‘meaning check’ every now and again to ensure that your child understands the text.

After reading: talk about the book. What was it about? Did it match your child’s expectations? Ask questions beginning with the words how and why to check that your child has been able to read between the lines. Ask whether anything seemed puzzling. Then ask your child to explain what the best and worst bits of the book were, and why.

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